Is Jesus truly the Master of our life?

Or are we being “mastered” by…

~our husband?

~our wife?

~our children?

~our grand children?

~those that use us?

~our job?

~our home?

~our car?

~our church busy-ness?

~social media?

~cigarettes?

~alcohol?

~drugs?

~food?

~money?

~sports?

If our life is determined by anything but Jesus first, then HE is not our Master (the leader of our life). We are then being mastered (controlled) by the flesh.  We can not let anyone or anything steer us away from the Lord our God’s peace.

 

❤ ❤ ❤

 

 

Today as we go out into the world…

Image result for deny you before my father kjv

 

 

**that they may see your good works:
meaning their zeal and fervency; their plainness and openness; their sincerity, faithfulness, and integrity; their courage and intrepidity; their diligence, industry, and indefatigableness in preaching the Gospel; their strict regard to truth, the honour of Christ, and the good of souls; as also their very great care and concern to recommend the doctrines of grace, by their example in their lives and conversations:**

 

 

“It is better to take refuge in the LORD than to trust in man.” – Psalm 118:8

I like to tell people I’m a Theology 101 kind of guy. Praise the Lord that His Good News! is so simple even a child can understand it. But I appreciate the work that godly theologians have done over the years and I have picked up a few things here and there. One thing that […]

via The idolatry of “Thomism” among some evangelical intellectuals — excatholic4christ

Sadly, this is the reality for many young people. ( Caution~Graphic)

“Tompkins said doctors believed her daughter used methamphetamine laced with another substance which caused her to hallucinate.”

 

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/02/25/mother-woman-20-who-gouged-out-eyes-speaks-on-hazards-illegal-drugs.html

 

It does not have to be this way! Prayers that as she recovers she comes to the knowledge of our heavenly Father and will be made a new creature because of His love for her through Jesus!

❤ ❤ ❤

But I feel…

*Proverbs 28:26*

26 He that trusteth in his own heart is a fool: but whoso walketh wisely, he shall be delivered.

*Jeremiah 17:9*

The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?

 

Don’t be a fool and base your faith on feelings.The heart is deceitful AND wicked. Follow God’s Holy Spirit.

When we start basing our faith on how “we feel” we start adding to God’s Word and/or taking away to suit our own ways-usually to satisfy the flesh 😦 Then comes our foolishness making a mockery of our Heavenly Father that has saved us from His wrath through Jesus~ His Only Begotten Son.

BE CAREFUL WE OF ALL PEOPLE IN THIS WORLD SHOULD KNOW BETTER! STAY IN HIS SIMPLICITY THROUGH JESUS!

❤ ❤ ❤

Image result for Proverbs 28:26

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“…and take up his cross and follow me” What did Jesus mean when He said this?

Jesus said:

*Matthew 16:24

24 Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

*Mark 8:34

34 And when he had called the people unto him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

*Luke 9:23

23 And he said to them all, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me.

 

Answer: Let’s begin with what Jesus didn’t mean. Many people interpret “cross” as some burden they must carry in their lives: a strained relationship, a thankless job, a physical illness. With self-pitying pride, they say, “That’s my cross I have to carry.” Such an interpretation is not what Jesus meant when He said, “Take up your cross and follow Me.”

When Jesus carried His cross up Golgotha to be crucified, no one was thinking of the cross as symbolic of a burden to carry. To a person in the first-century, the cross meant one thing and one thing only: death by the most painful and humiliating means human beings could develop.

Two thousand years later, Christians view the cross as a cherished symbol of atonement, forgiveness, grace, and love. But in Jesus’ day, the cross represented nothing but torturous death. Because the Romans forced convicted criminals to carry their own crosses to the place of crucifixion, bearing a cross meant carrying their own execution device while facing ridicule along the way to death.

Therefore, “Take up your cross and follow Me” means being willing to die in order to follow Jesus. This is called “dying to self.” It’s a call to absolute surrender. After each time Jesus commanded cross bearing, He said, “For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will save it. What good is it for a man to gain the whole world, and yet lose or forfeit his very self?” (*Luke 9:24-25). Although the call is tough, the reward is matchless.

Wherever Jesus went, He drew crowds. Although these multitudes often followed Him as Messiah, their view of who the Messiah really was—and what He would do—was distorted. They thought the Christ would usher in the restored kingdom. They believed He would free them from the oppressive rule of their Roman occupiers. Even Christ’s own inner circle of disciples thought the kingdom was coming soon (*Luke 19:11). When Jesus began teaching that He was going to die at the hands of the Jewish leaders and their Gentile overlords (*Luke 9:22), His popularity sank. Many of the shocked followers rejected Him. Truly, they were not able to put to death their own ideas, plans, and desires, and exchange them for His.

Following Jesus is easy when life runs smoothly; our true commitment to Him is revealed during trials. Jesus assured us that trials will come to His followers (*John 16:33). Discipleship demands sacrifice, and Jesus never hid that cost.

In *Luke 9:57-62, three people seemed willing to follow Jesus. When Jesus questioned them further, their commitment was half-hearted at best. They failed to count the cost of following Him. None was willing to take up his cross and crucify upon it his own interests.

Therefore, Jesus appeared to dissuade them. How different from the typical Gospel presentation! How many people would respond to an altar call that went, “Come follow Jesus, and you may face the loss of friends, family, reputation, career, and possibly even your life”? The number of false converts would likely decrease! Such a call is what Jesus meant when He said, “Take up your cross and follow Me.”

If you wonder if you are ready to take up your cross, consider these questions:
• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means losing some of your closest friends?
• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means alienation from your family?
• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means the loss of your reputation?
• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means losing your job?
• Are you willing to follow Jesus if it means losing your life?

In some places of the world, these consequences are reality. But notice the questions are phrased, “Are you willing?” Following Jesus doesn’t necessarily mean all these things will happen to you, but are you willing to take up your cross? If there comes a point in your life where you are faced with a choice—Jesus or the comforts of this life—which will you choose?

Commitment to Christ means taking up your cross daily, giving up your hopes, dreams, possessions, even your very life if need be for the cause of Christ. Only if you willingly take up your cross may you be called His disciple( Luke 14:27). The reward is worth the price. Jesus followed His call of death to self (“Take up your cross and follow Me”) with the gift of life in Christ: “For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will find it” (*Matthew 16:25-26).

~Amen ❤ ❤ ❤

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